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Episode 28 of the Senior Care Industry Netcast is live!

We were fortunate enough to have Dr. Joy Poskozim, JoyfulDentalCare.com on our show and she offered some great insight and #advice for other #seniorcare and #healthcare providers.

About This Episode:

EP 28: The Senior Care Industry Netcast with Joy Poskozim, DDS, PC, JoyfulDentalCare.com 2
Joy Poskozim, DDS, PC

Joy Poskozim, DDS, PC

Joy Poskozim, DDS, PC and the staff at Joyful Dental Care provide quality dental care to patients in the Chicago area, focusing on a comprehensive approach to oral health. By treating and educating patients, our team helps patients to stay healthy in between visits. Our staff understands the importance of listening to patients, helping them to feel comfortable and relaxed. This personal approach is evident in everything we do. From making an appointment, filling out paperwork, conducting an examination, and providing dental treatments, the staff at Joyful Dental Care take the time to connect with patients and give them the thoughtful attention they deserve. Our team is trained on advanced dental procedures and techniques so that patients can benefit from the latest in dental care.

Check out the blog post with the #video 📹 and look for more episodes coming soon as we travel the U.S. to find the leaders in #seniorcare to share their insights, experiences, and joy. If you’d like to be on our show, check out the link here: https://www.seniorcareindustrynetcast.com/netcast

Full Transcript:

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

This is Valerie VanBooven with the senior care industry net cast where leaders with three or more years in the senior care industry, share their experience and advice. It’s six questions in nine minutes. So let’s get to it.

In a few sentences, tell us who you are and what you do.

Joy Poskozim:

My name is Dr. Joy Poskozim. I own Joyful Dental Care, which is a general dental practice in the city of Chicago. But for the last 10 years, I have also been going into assisted care facilities, memory care facilities, people’s homes, providing oral care for those that cannot come to me.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Nice. I wish there were about two million more of you out there.

Joy Poskozim:

Thank you.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

We need lots of mobile dentistry would be really great.

Joy Poskozim:

Yeah.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

So what’s the best thing about serving aging adults?

Joy Poskozim:

Oh, it is the immediate gratification of seeing the contentment of knowing that their mouths can be saved. That their dentures may not be completely unusable. That there’s a way that we can fix them. There’s a product that I use for dry lips that as soon as I put it on their lips and they’re rubbing their lips together and they can feel the moisture going back into their lips because of severe dry mouth due to the medications that they’re on. The hugs, well, not right now. But usually the hugs and just the wonderful reactions that I get from the caregivers for providing the need that they have for proper oral care. The sharing of information as well has been absolutely wonderful. From one end, I’ve done a walk around their particular home to just take a walk outside because she wanted to and we stopped and we looked at the pansies that she helped plant because she’s part of the gardening committee.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Awe.

Joy Poskozim:

And two nights ago after work, she is, that particular patient is doing a rendition of a radio show.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Wow.

Joy Poskozim:

So I found it on YouTube. And so we listened to it together after I inserted her lower partial denture. So it became a visit. It becomes visits and sharing their lives and creating a relationship with these patients and their loved ones. It’s beautiful.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

That is so wonderful that you take the time to get to know them as a person. And you know what, I would imagine that some of these folks haven’t had dental care in years if ever, maybe. You know, as I do, that dental care can be expensive when it’s private pay. And so being able to find some solutions so that they don’t have to get a whole brand new set of dentures or whatever it is, I’m sure there’s a million cool things that you can do to save them a little money here and there. And I’m sure they’re so grateful that somebody can come to their rescue and make their mounts feel better. So that’s awesome.

Joy Poskozim:

Yeah.

What Do You Think About Online Marketing For Senior Service Businesses?

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Awesome. Okay, let’s switch gears just a little bit. I hear from other senior service providers out there that marketing online can be challenging. I think it is. A little confusing, it’s ever changing. So what are your experiences and thoughts about getting the word out about your practice?

Joy Poskozim:

So the great thing about Facebook, especially if you have a business page, is that you can preplan your posts and you can schedule those posts accordingly. So consistency is key. If you’re not being consistent with your marketing and if your lackadaisical in focus and what your goals are and what you’re trying to achieve for your message to your audience, then yeah, then you’re not going to thrive. So what I like to do with specifically with Facebook is that, I mean, I started last weekend and I did my entire month of July with a game plan of what I wanted to focus on. Sometimes I do one particular message for the week. Like, so for example, I’ll do a whole week on information on dry mouth and not just information on dry mouth, but also what I could do to help seniors with dry mouth or signs and symptoms of dry mouth for example.

                This particular month I’m doing, I did a whole month of one particular topic. Also there was one month where it’s senior month, senior awareness month, senior health month. Focusing on that is so incredibly important too, to put that message out there that we need to be catering to our seniors. We need to be helping them out. So, yeah, so that is number one is focusing on my Facebook page and making sure that I have a consistent message throughout. And then secondary with my LinkedIn and now recently with Instagram is … Facebook is my major that I get the most feedback that way. But then I also supplement with LinkedIn. But every single day and I do it organically. I want the message to sound like me. I have friends who are other healthcare providers. They have hired agencies to put together their post or whatever. It doesn’t sound like them. It doesn’t reflect who they are and what their practice is.

                So I think that’s incredibly important to have it sound like you and make it personal. I mean, in one Facebook post, I mentioned about the fact that we took a walk after I inserted her complete denture. We took a walk around the home and it was wonderful to share. So those three things are incredibly important. Consistency, similar, or one topic to focus on and be consistent about it because repetition, right? One and done is not going to win any audience, right?

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Right.

Joy Poskozim:

Yeah. So, I mean, you had to do what, they’re saying nine times now? It used to be four. But you have to repeat something nine times before it sinks in. So yeah. So those are the things that I do.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Great. So you are on the ball. I would totally agree with you. If you hire an agency to do your online marketing, that’s fine. But you have to participate. You have to be there. You have to put in your own stuff. Pictures, we have a lot of folks who do pictures of their staff, pictures of their caregivers, caregiver of the month. Involve the human element in your posts and that goes a whole lot longer way than just the typical informational educational posts. Add a flair of your organization in there and participate in that. It is social media after all right?

Joy Poskozim:

Well said. Well said. You’re absolutely right. And I fault, and I have a problem with that too, is making sure that I am including my office staff or including even just maybe the floor nurse who helped me so much with one particular resident or with a caregiver through an agency who is exceptional. And we bonded. I’ve had where caregivers have become my patients at my office.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah.

Joy Poskozim:

Literally because of the relationship that we’ve developed and me treating this particular patient over time. And so, yeah. And you’re absolutely right. Those are things I could totally put in for my social media posts and that’s great marketing. You’re absolutely right.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah. Just be you and people love … we’re all, I guess, voyeurs to a certain extent where we want to see what your life is like or what your practice is like or what your thoughts are. So you’re right.

Joy Poskozim:

Tell Us About Leaders or Organizations in the Senior Care Industry Who Have Made an Impact On You.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Being personal, being professional and personal at the same time, it totally works. Okay. Thank you so much for that, those words of wisdom, because you’re exactly right. Okay. I would imagine that in your life there have been other successful leaders that have made an impact on you. Maybe they’ve been, maybe it’s an organization or a person who have really maybe inspired or mentored, or just you thought, “wow, they do such a great job.” Who are those people out there in your life?

Joy Poskozim:

What really jump started my at home dentistry service was the organization Continuity of Care. I don’t know if you’re familiar with continuity of Care, but it’s a great organization where senior professionals, when I say senior professionals it’s professionals that work with seniors in the senior community in the senior care industry. And they come together once a month, where they network, they exchange resources, or I should say we, and contacts. And under normal circumstances, we meet up at a particular facility or a particular agency. So therefore we have about maybe a half hour of networking ahead of time and then we have a key presenter. And then we are able to do our elevator speech.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah.

Joy Poskozim:

And it is incredible because it’s a different place every time. If it isn’t a home, then there is time for tours afterwards. If it’s in an agency, then they get to showcase their business. That really, like I said, that really jump started because I was able to do a presentation on oral care and it was only supposed to be 45 minutes. It ran into an hour after asking, “Is it okay that she continues?” And the last 15 minutes of Q&A was really powerful because it showed that there is care there it’s just finding what is the right way to go about achieving oral care.

                So, yeah. So Continuity of Care, it’s a nationwide organization. They are in major cities. I know in Chicago, there’s at least where I’m from, there’s at least four or five different groups that you can partake in. And they’re wonderful people because we’re all of like mind. We’re all trying to achieve the same goal and it’s supporting and I can’t say enough about it.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Good. Well, awesome. I think there’s one I’m in the St. Louis area. So I’m just a few hours south of you.

Joy Poskozim:

Yeah.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

I know there’s one here they used to call it Breakthrough Coalition, but similar concept. And they could have changed 10 times in the last several years, but same concept. And I can remember going to those meetings and really enjoying getting to know the folks there and what the different services were they provided. It definitely, and it’s funny because it’s a small world. People change jobs, they come back to the meeting, but now they work over here.

Joy Poskozim:

Yes.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Or they’re representing a different … if you’re old like me and you’ve been around long enough, it’s the same circulating in your community.

Joy Poskozim:

Absolutely. Absolutely. The turnover is incredible. That being said, though, they still want to see you in the industry. And I think that says something about the people that are involved, like us who are involved with this that how important it is. It’s just finding the right fit. Do you know what I mean? I think that’s what it really comes down to.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah. It’s nice that you know that, “Oh yeah. I remember her. She worked at.” “Oh, well now she’s at, yeah.”

Joy Poskozim:

Yeah.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

But over the course of years and we all grow older together and get more mature in our careers and we all are still pretty much in the same senior care space. And I love that. So yeah, absolutely. What a great organization, you’re right. Find the group like that in your area. And if there’s not one, start one because.

Joy Poskozim:

Literally.

What Piece of Advice Would You Give to Other Senior Care Providers?

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

It’s worth having for sure. Okay. What piece of advice would you give to other senior care providers?

Joy Poskozim:

The most important thing is realizing that we need to be focusing on overall health and oral health is included in overall health. So if your particular agency does not have training for your CNAs or your caregivers, then start having some kind of training for oral care. It will, number one, set your agency apart from other ones, because unfortunately there was so much other things to learn, right? I mean, we have to think about the vital organs, right? The heart, the lungs, the brain, the mouth falls by the wayside and perfectly understandable. But the mouth only really comes into play when someone can’t swallow, they can’t eat or the denture keeps falling out of their mouths and they don’t understand why.

                I get called in a lot when someone who is failing to thrive. And so they’re beginning to lose weight and they’ve done the blood test. The doctor has been in. The psychologist has been in. I’m the last person to be calling and sometimes, not that I need to be first. Obviously the primary care physician is primary, right? That being said, it would be nice to be number two because a lot of times I’ll find something that I might’ve been able to fix. And now it’s been three months and now it’s something that has to be removed or the denture that I maybe been able to fix before, now because it wasn’t fitting is now lost. And so instead of me adjusting that denture or adding a clasp or adding a tooth to make that denture fit again, we now have to start all over again and that’s expensive. So, recognizing that the mouth is critical to someone’s overall health. We can’t eat, we can’t live, right? We’re not going to thrive.

                So having training, having contact local dentist, join an organization like I said like Continuity of Care where you have a dentist who caters to seniors. Contact a local home that has or a secure facility that has, they have to, have a dentist, at least as a resource. That they can come in and I promise you they’ll come in and with a smile to provide that education on signs and symptoms. Like I said, it’s going to set you apart and it will provide focus for the loved ones. Oh, I never even thought of that. Well, but yes and we do that. Huge, I can’t say that enough.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Oh, I think you’re absolutely right. I use my dad as an example all the time. And I will say this, very interestingly he has dementia. He’s 71 years old. He has vascular dementia from diabetes, heart disease and he is in a nursing home. Very good care. I cannot say enough about them. They’ve been wonderful. But he also has, but he has dementia. Even though he can talk to me on the phone and have a regular conversation, he can walk around the halls. He’s pretty cool and he’s funny and all those things. He still has dementia for sure.

                So, but we took him on a trip, I guess not since COVID. But before that last year, we took him on a trip to Kentucky to see his dad and family and all that and it was great. And I remember saying, “Don’t forget your toothbrush.” And he said, “I have a toothbrush?” Now I know that he just didn’t remember that he had a toothbrush.

Joy Poskozim:

Right, right, right.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

I wonder because I know when I go to see him, there’s this toothbrush and his toothpaste right there on the sink. And I wonder how many days go by sometimes where he doesn’t even remember to brush his teeth. He’s physically able, but he doesn’t know to do that and how often is he being reminded? It seems like a little thing, but interesting that while we were on our trip, I would say, “Be sure to go in there and brush your teeth.” You have to. It’s just the little things like that, that I don’t know how often our staff remembers. Now, if someone can’t brush their teeth, hopefully they’re getting oral care because they wouldn’t otherwise be able to. But for those who are still ambulatory and still able to talk to you and have a great conversation, you still have to say, “David, have you brushed your teeth today?”

Joy Poskozim:

Right? Not necessarily part of the ADLs, right? It’s not necessarily part of the activities of daily living of what is required for either a caregiver in someone’s home or in an assisted care facility. It’s not necessarily part of that. So what I’ve had to start doing is literally write physician’s orders. So that now that’s a legal document, right? That has been signed by me. It’s been dated, it’s been signed by the nurse, the charge nurse, whatever to make sure that, and I will literally write brush David’s teeth after breakfast, before bedtime. And unfortunately, sometimes that’s what it has to come to in order to make sure that this particular resident is getting or patient is getting that care.

                If someone is admitted into a care facility or if someone is even being accepted into through an agency, there’s a series of questions they have to go through. There’s only nine for the mouth and one of them is does a person have a denture or not have a denture?

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah.

Joy Poskozim:

Not is it broken? Not if they’re wearing it, not if they know how to take it in or out. Not if so on and so forth. It’s just do they have one or not. It’s very vague. But like I said, there’s no real, it’s unfortunate, but it’s not part of getting them up in the morning. Making sure they have clean clothes, making sure they’re making it to breakfast. Making sure that they’re eating. It’s not part of the daily grind that is required in homes. And so you’re right. I mean, that is absolutely huge. Yes, like you said your dad is physically capable of doing it. You tell him to do and he’ll go in there and do it. But it’s that reminder that we need to instill in our caregivers and the CNAs and the nurses that this is incredibly important.

                So once again, I’ll get called when they have bad breath, right? When they have malodor and it’s like, “No problem, fantastic. Let’s see what’s going on.” That could be a sign of a lot of things. But they’ve ruled all those things out. So now once again, they’ve come to me and it’s like well, so I’ll have the CNA there or I’ll have the charge nurse there or the floor nurse there. And it’s like, “Well, okay Susie let’s brush your teeth” and she just looks at it. And I’m like, “Okay, so now we know that Susie needs help in brushing their teeth.:

                “Oh doc, we never thought of it.”

                “Not a problem.” You know? This is what we got.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Have you ever run into a case where they didn’t recognize that the patient had thrush?

Joy Poskozim:

Oh, yeah. Yeah.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Okay. So, we’re going over our nine minutes, but I don’t care because this is perfect. I became a nurse in 1992, so I’m super old. And when I was in nursing school, the first patient that they’re talking 89 probably, the first patient that I was, “This is your patient today.” And of course I’m the equivalent of a nurse’s aid at that point and no experience at all and just basic training and we’re in nursing school. So I walk into the patient’s room and she’s in her bed and she says, “Here.” She takes her teeth out, which of course I’m what, 18 years old. She takes her teeth out and she hands them to me. She puts him in my hands and she says “Clean these up.” And so I go in and I clean it. Mind you, I haven’t even put on gloves, barely said my name and I’m holding her teeth. So my nursing instructor eventually comes by and says, “Well, you know that patient has thrush?” And I was like, “Ah!” So I didn’t know anything.

                So the lack of training at that moment was very apparent. I should’ve had gloves on. I should have been able to … and then she showed me, “Here, let’s look at her mouth together and see what that looks like.” And then when we looked at her mouth, I could tell there was something wrong. And if no one had ever educated me on what thrush looked like, I would have never known in a million years that that’s what that was.

Joy Poskozim:

Absolutely.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

And she was suffering from that. So just the basics of showing if somebody has thrush, show everybody what that looks like.

Joy Poskozim:

Oh, yeah.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

So if you see another patient with this in their mouth, that’s what this is and we need to fix it. So just little things like that. I mean, there’s no way I would have ever known that as a nurse’s aid.

Joy Poskozim:

Oh, absolutely. And to follow with another story that literally just happened on Monday, I’ve been going to this one particular facility, which is fantastic. And I say this place is fantastic because they have a dental room with an actual dental chair with the dental light. It’s wonderful.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Nice.

Joy Poskozim:

And they had discretionary income. Every year they raise money for a certain project and I got them to raise money for the nomad dental x-rays. So I’m able to go into the people’s rooms, and to actually take x-rays of particular teeth that I think that either need to be taken out or if there’s an infection, so on and so forth. Okay. So this great, great, great home okay? The nurse calls me and says, “Oh, this patient’s denture came out.” Yeah, “This patient’s denture came out and we can’t get it back in and we were not sure why.” Okay, fantastic.

                So I start to ask some questions and I’m like, “Well does it got metal in it?” She’s like, “Yes, it has metal.” Okay. She’s like, “But I’m looking there and I don’t see a tooth. I’m looking. And I’m like, “Hm, is it a denture or was this something that was cemented in the mouth? Was this a crown or a bridge?” And she’s like, “Oh doctor, I think you’re right. I think it’s a cap. I think it’s a crown because it’s gold.”

                We go from a denture, so I’m thinking complete denture. The patient has no teeth that’s immediately where my mind goes. And so it’s a complete denture and it’s not going in and we’re not sure why. Okay. So I’m thinking swelling. I’m thinking, you know, to now we’re at the other end of the extreme, where it’s a single tooth where it broke off, it’s a gold crown. And so I said, “Well, okay, take a look on the inside for me. Is it full or is it hollow?” She said, “Oh no, it’s full.” And I said, “Okay, well, there’s your tooth. That’s where the tooth is. The tooth is broken off probably due to decay and honestly, even with x-rays, we probably would not have been able to determine that anyway. So now it’s up to, you’re going to unfortunately, have to throw that into biohazards because it’s considered a biohazard.”

                And what I was thinking, I’m like, “I really hope she’s wearing gloves right now holding that thing.” But of course, I didn’t say that. I’m like, eh. I said, “There’s nothing left, but the cool thing about it is that the body will tend to know what to do. So the gum will just close over it and just kind of call it a day. Is there any swelling, any abscess?” She said, “No.” So I said, “Fantastic, we’re just going to let sleeping dogs lie. If you want me to call the family, I can let them know. But suffice to say, I think that he’s going to be okay.”

                So she’s like, “You don’t need to come?” I’m like, “I don’t think so. I think in this situation you caught it in time. Monitor, make sure there’s no swelling or anything. But trust me, that probably would have happened already.” But once again the point of the matter is the terms, right.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah.

Joy Poskozim:

We go from something that is removable, that I potentially can come in fix or whatever, to something that is not that case at all. And it’s really knowing the proper terms and no fault on her own. She just was never educated to know the terms. Do you know what I mean?

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Absolutely.

Joy Poskozim:

So once again, it goes back to education and like you were saying too, experience. So what she should have done too and something I didn’t even think of and I’m going to actually use what you said. Okay, bring everyone there to do a little show and tell of what you have in your hand and what to look for and what to do in case this happens again.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah.

Joy Poskozim:

I mean, absolutely brilliant. You’re right. Bring everyone over, have it be an educational thing, a little wellness tip and then know what to do about it afterwards.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah.

Joy Poskozim:

So thank you for that. I appreciate it.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Oh, well, it’s just something that you don’t think about until you’re old and I remember now that we’re talking about oral, that’s literally my first patient experience was her oral health and throwing her dentures at me and saying, “Clean these up.” Which I gratefully, “Oh, yes, yes, yes.” Did it, but then my nursing instructor was like, “Where are your gloves?” Let’s find out why that’s important.

Joy Poskozim:

Yeah.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

So anyway, but yeah, it’s something especially when you’re young, you just don’t think about. You don’t know about all these things that can happen to us. So, okay. So we’ve rambled a lot and it’s my fault, but I think this is fascinating because your oral health is so connected to everything else in your life and your health. Okay, what piece of advice would you give to other senior care providers?

Joy Poskozim:

Be consistent.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Brush your teeth.

Joy Poskozim:

Brush your teeth. Yes, exactly.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

You know I had to say that.

Joy Poskozim:

You’re a role model to your clients here, to your patients. You brush your teeth and then do as you say and do. Yeah. No, oral care is incredibly important and I think it’s really important to also if you don’t know, ask.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah.

Joy Poskozim:

If you don’t have a dental resource, if you don’t, I mean, you could potentially … I mean I would hope that everyone has a dentist, right? So if you have a question regarding a client, then you can ask your dentist about it. I will admit, like you said at the beginning, there’s not a lot of us out there. And so not every dentist is going to feel comfortable in handling a situation to the point where the newer dentists that are coming out their learning implants and as well they should. It’s a complicated procedure and they need to learn that in school.

                But on the flip side, they’re not learning so much about dentures. So the newer graduates are not as familiar and not as experienced with dentures as the more older, more experienced dentists that have chosen to do dentures in their practice. There are several dentists that are my age that have chosen not to do dentures at all. They’ve had horrible experience with them. They feel that they don’t achieve patient satisfaction. So therefore they’re not going to even have it a part of their practice. So having a resource that you can rely on to ask questions about geriatric oral care, senior oral care, because it will happen. There will be a situation where you haven’t seen it before, you don’t know what to do, and you really need that person that you can count on to have an answer or say, “You know what? I need to see that.”

                In this time of COVIDI would hope that teledentistry, telemedicine … I had someone take a picture of a denture the other day because someone had fallen and they said, “Well, the denture is broken. Do you think you can fix it?” I’m like, “Well, could you take a picture and show it to me?” Unfortunately, this is a denture I can’t fix. It broke into four pieces. So that’s unfortunate. Some cases, yes, I can. This situation, not so much. But I was able to take a look at it without having me to go anywhere and say, “Okay, over the phone, this is what is required now.” So having that resource is so incredibly important so that you can provide truly overall care for your clients and for your patients.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Sure, absolutely. Yep. I would totally agree with that. Find somebody in your community who’s willing to answer questions or train your staff or do something that … I’m sure there are a lot of dentists that are very willing to-

Joy Poskozim:

Oh yeah.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

… at least help educate. If they don’t want to see patients as one thing. But if they’re willing to educate that would help everybody tremendously. So, absolutely. Okay last question is supposed to be a fun question. Some people say it’s hard, some people say it’s fun.

When you have a win in life or professionally, how do you like to celebrate?

Joy Poskozim:

I share it.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Yeah.

Joy Poskozim:

I think there’s so much negativity that’s shared that a bright spot in someone’s day with a client or a patient, it just warms my heart. It’s a warm, fuzzy, right? I want to share it. It’s almost like a social hug. Something that I can share that saying in everyone’s day right now that we’re dealing with all these, with anxiety and stress and all that stuff. Here is a beautiful moment in my life that just occurred that was great for me. It was great for the resident and it just really set the tone for the day. So I believe in sharing. It’s so important to share positivity and as often as possible.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Well, you certainly have the right name for it Joy and Joyful Dental.

Joy Poskozim:

Thank you.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

All right. Well, thank you for being on the show and helping us understand more about oral care and your amazing practice.

Joy Poskozim:

Thank you.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

I appreciate it so much.

Joy Poskozim:

Thank you so much. I really appreciate you.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

All right.

Joy Poskozim:

I love what you’re doing here. This is great.

Valerie VanBooven RN  BSN:

Thank you very much.