Senior Care Industry Netcast Video

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Senior Care Industry Netcast Full Transcript

Jim Myers:

We actually have four divisions under one roof. We have personal care, we have traditional home health care, we have kind of a transitional care program as well with an NP, and we also have hospice that way too. We have approximately 125 staff PRN, full time, part time, both clinical and nonclinical. I have five direct reports that are responsible for acquiring referrals from the community in the business development aspect of the game that way, including for hospital systems, ILS, memory cares, independent livings, residential homes, all servicing an area of 9,300 square miles, which is about the size of Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Delaware combined. What’s the best thing about serving adult, senior adults? I believe my why is really about protecting. I’m not a really natural caregiver. I’m not the natural nurturing type. I’m a good husband, don’t get me wrong, but I’m not the natural caregiving type and so I’ve really kind of gravitated toward more of a protecting a vulnerable population and that is seniors for me.

Jim Myers:

And I’ve got intense opinions about that. I’ve actually been the president of a group called uniting New Mexicans against adult abuse here in New Mexico. So exploitation, abuse, and neglect are really high on my charts that way to make sure. And preventative measures frankly to keep them safe at home is really appropriate for us to do and guard as we care for the senior care population. Well, first of all on the site issue as far as your own internet site and so forth, it should be informative and educational and if possible linked to other nonprofit organizations. I like to do that when I can, including legal, medical, informational modifications and so forth and so on. As for the confusing part of that question, I’m not sure why it’s confusing. It’s always changing. I had an old pastor friend of mine say once, “The only people that like change are wet babies,” and that may be true for senior adults as well, but it’s going to be ever changing what we do.

Jim Myers:

We’ve obviously been through some massive, massive changes expedited over the last few months, but the creative juices and the innovative things that are happening right now are really positively mind blowing and that’s what’s exciting about it. Best we can we all need to be nimble. We all need to use that over word pivot word, overused pivot word to really kind of make sure we’re solving the new challenges and opportunities that we have in front of us. There are so many unsung and sung heroes. Frankly, I think the group I think about most are the professional nonmedical caregivers, honestly, and the family caregivers that are out there in the millions, obviously we’re 60, 70, 80 million people are actually doing caregiving. I think without them, homes would be less safe. People would go without food, cleanliness and medication reminders and we’d have a bigger, bigger mess than we do have right now in terms of unnecessary hospitalizations.

Jim Myers:

In terms of people that I’ve worked with. I think of my friend Karen Cooper, who I texted yesterday, lost her nephew, a really sad thing at age 32, but she’s a licensed insurance agent and Medicare or Med Care is what it is. But she just selflessly gives her time that way to her own family members. I think of Ron Hidalgo, friend of mine who is the executive director of a place called Silver Horizons New Mexico, which feeds about 3000 seniors every month with about 20 mobile food pantries that way too. I think of Duffy Swan, an older mentor friend of mine who started a place called the Grief Resource Center here in New Mexico. Just so people do have a place to go in a massive situation like we’re experiencing right now of loss, whether it’s death or divorce or that sort of thing. It’s a great thing that he’s done.

Jim Myers:

I think of a friend named Mary Martinez, who is the owner of Home Instead Senior Care here in town. She’s been an advocate for seniors for really 30 years and she graduated from New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. But you will gravitate toward people that you really know are in it for the right reasons in senior care, and she certainly is that way, safeguarding seniors along the way. I think of another Mary, Mary Shortel who runs a nonprofit apartment complex with AHEPA, if you’ve never heard of that, that’s the American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association and it’s been around since 1922 and they’re in different States and so forth, but she runs this place for underserved seniors that way does a great job, the apartments are clean, it’s dignified way of living even though they’re subsidized by a AHEPA itself.

Jim Myers:

And I could go on and on with people that I know here and around the country that are really gifted in senior care and they’ve all left their own thumbprints and using their lives to better the lives of the seniors around us. I think we need to continually ask if we’re in the industry to make a difference. I think passions wean and burn out happens, but our real circumstances are always changing. It’s like the touch free thermometers that we have out there, we always have to kind of take our temperature and see how we’re feeling. Do we still resonate? Do we still vibrate? And it’s not the coffee, in terms of taking care of the senior population, it’s such a vulnerable one, but we have to have a really a sense of calling to really make a difference that way. We all know that when you work your passion, you work better that way too.

Jim Myers:

So, and we’ll all have challenging bad frustrating days, but in the cumulative look, when you really look at your life in the end of the day, are you vocationally present? And if not, explore what makes you vocationally present and make a difference that way. I think my best and favorite way to celebrate a win is really sitting around a fire pit at night with my wife, drinking a glass of red wine. I’ve had heart issues, I have heart disease so hey, it’s good for me, don’t judge. In the workplace I celebrate wins by really writing either by hand or email or text, just unexpected compliments. I think those are really, really powerful to folks. I think the best kind of note is simple, but specific and it’s just totally unexpected and I really love to do that and love to see people just kind of light up and be encouraged by that.

Jim Myers:

One of my favorite quotes on compliments is by a faith based writer named Robin Kramer, and she says, “Unexpressed gratitude is like winking at somebody in the dark. You know how you feel about them, but they don’t,” and I think that’s just a great way of just kind of encapsulating why it’s important to encourage everybody right now, especially right now during these kind of tough times. The power of an unexpected compliment, I think should really never be underestimated, it’ll help our work situation, helps us be human and kind. And after all, we are humankind and it reminds us why we’re all in this together. God bless.