Full Transcript:

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

This is Valerie VanBooven with the Senior Care Industry Netcast, where leaders with three or more years in the senior care industry share their advice. So let’s get to it. In a few sentences, tell us who you are and what you do.

Rosalind Jones: Jacksonville’s Best Caregivers, https://thecaregivercafe.net/

Hi, I am Rosalind Jones, I’m the CEO and owner of Jacksonville’s Best Caregivers. We’re located in the sunshine state of Jacksonville, Florida. And we provide four levels of specialized care to your loved one; sitter, homemaker and companion, home health aide, and certified nursing assistant. When you can’t do it all, you give us a call.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Right. Oh, that’s great, I love that, “When you can’t do it all,” and you can’t really, “Give us a call.” So what is the best thing about serving seniors and their families?

Rosalind Jones:

Wow. The best thing that has been good for me personally, and I can’t speak for my staff, but just for me, is that I know that I can extend the quality of their life. That they don’t have to be alone, and because of the interaction that we give them, the constant, love, and we take them on, as I call them, field trips or excursions, we take them out. Whatever we do, that little bit will give them maybe an extra year, or extra two years to where if they had been alone, they may have died from isolation.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Yeah, absolutely. And right now, that’s one of those biggest concerns is, everybody’s so isolated. So yeah, that’s great. And it does. It keeps people, gives them a sense of purpose, and a sense of looking forward to something, like their caregiver coming in this week, and going somewhere. So, yeah. All right, I hear from other-

Rosalind Jones:

It does because a lot of…

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

No, go ahead. Go ahead.

Rosalind Jones:

No, no, no, no. What I was saying is, as a lot of people get older, they feel like they have no purpose or no one wants to listen to them. And as caregivers, we’re that kind of that neutral ear, that new ear, and no one has probably heard, we haven’t heard their stories, but as the years go on, we probably hear them over and over and over again, but that’s what we’re there for.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. Let’s switch gears for just a second and talk about online marketing, because you do a really good job with this. I know it’s challenging, it can be confusing, what has been your experience with online marketing?

Rosalind Jones:

When I got in it, I didn’t know what the heck I was doing. I had no clue. Somebody told me, “Smack that button,” and I smacked it. I smacked the live button on Facebook, in the first two years I did my own line, I did some local TV interviews here, and then I did live Facebook Lives for at least 18 months. Sometimes two, three, four times a day, but it wasn’t getting me the traction like I’m getting now because I have a better strategy, I have a better team that’s helping me with my marketing versus I was trying to lead and bleed. I was like a mash unit, a little bit here, a little bit there, put a bandaid on it and then push it out.

Rosalind Jones:

It wasn’t bad, but it’s not as good as what I have now. I’m way better. My strategy now is that I have a VA, I have a team that loads on YouTube, I have a team that handles IG, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook. Now that’s given me the opportunity now to do podcasts and to be a boss, and to hopefully get out of this uniform. My goal is by January 1 of 2020, I won’t have to be in the trenches with my employees, even though I don’t mind. God knows I love it. I’ll miss it, but I know that there are other things such as podcasts, where I need to get some information out and I can’t do while I’m in the uniform.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Yeah, absolutely. And I think it’s lovely that you still work just right alongside all the other caregivers, but I would agree that taking yourself out of being kind of more of an employee in the business and being more of the leader, doing the marketing and doing the stuff that really promotes the business and helps it grow, is a great place to be. So I think you’re going to definitely meet those goals, because I’ve seen your marketing and I know your team does a really good job for you. So you have an excellent team there. They do a great job. Awesome. I do-

Rosalind Jones:

And I’m grateful. And another thing is, as a business owner, we’ve got to remove ourselves because sometimes our employees, because they see us in the uniform, they don’t take us serious because we’re right there on the frontline. And there’s no fine line between boss and employee. There’s not that hard line, so I have to remove myself out. And I see it, because I have empathy and sympathy, and I’ll` let some things slide to where if I was away from them, I think I might be just a little bit harder on them. Have a little higher… I have high expectations, but then I can see their needs better, and understand not only what the client needs, but also what the employees need as well.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Yeah, totally understand. Totally understood. All right, so I’m going to ask you this question about successful leaders that may have made an impact. There’s probably some other people out there in your life, could be a parent, it could be a mentor or someone who’s an inspiration to you, or an organization that’s been an inspiration to you. Who would you like to give a shout out to?

Rosalind Jones:

My mother.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Yeah.

Rosalind Jones:

I am a third generation business owner. My mother and grandmother… Grandparents on my mother’s side were business owners. My grandparents had a clothing, would make clothes and had a dry cleaners’, and my grandmother did hair. And we’re talking about back in the thirties, forties and fifties. And then my mother and dad purchased properties, they had that. And so the entrepreneurial spirit is in my DNA, and out of all of the children, I guess I’m going to be the last one, unless mine decide to do something. But my mother, during Hurricane Katrina really showed me what it takes to be an entrepreneur because she not only was the deputy superintendent of schools during that time, she had to have the whole influx of people from New Orleans come up, and take care of not only in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but [inaudible 00:07:06] her staff, literally able to see how she outsourced and how important outsourcing is when you need help. So that’s why I’m able to do the outsourcing.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Awesome. Yeah, that is amazing. Your mother, that was a huge undertaking. Oh my goodness! And that storm, I mean, it just devastated so many. So what a wonderful role model. What a wonderful role model. Okay, what piece of advice would you give to other senior care providers out there?

Rosalind Jones:

Ask for help. Ask for help. Don’t be embarrassed about it. When you ask for help, it doesn’t mean that you’ve failed. It means that you recognize that you don’t want to hurt yourself, and you don’t want to bring hurt or harm or neglect to not only to yourself, but to the person you’re taking care of. A lot of times our parents or the one we’re taking care of will give us that guilt. “Well, if your sister was around, or if your mother was around, if your father was still around, they would take care of me.” Well, it’s just me. So let’s work it out. Let’s get some help in here or, you have to have that tough conversation, “I can’t do it by myself, I’m tired.” And it’s all right to be honest with the person, be honest with them. Ask for help and be honest about what you cannot do. And set your limitations, those are the three things: ask for help, set limitations, and be honest about what you can and cannot do.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Absolutely. Absolutely good advice for all caregivers out there. And so my last question is a fun one. When you have a win in life, it could be anything, a happy client, a happy employee. It could be just a great day. How do you like to celebrate?

Rosalind Jones:

Oh boy! What I do is, when the team has a good, this is for the team, and then I’ll talk about me. When all of us as a whole do something well, I try to give them gift cards, like gas gift cards, $25 to get gas. Or if a holiday is coming up [inaudible 00:09:52], 4th of July, I may give them a gift card to a grocery store, to let them know how I appreciate them. If they turned in their time slips all at one time, and try to turn everything in on time and my CPA is not on me about late time sheets, I will actually go in and work their shift and still pay them.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Oh, nice-

Rosalind Jones:

So that’s how I… Yeah. So that’s how I like to reward them. It’s not a lot, but it’s to let them know, “Hey, I appreciate you, I’m right here in the trenches with you, and I don’t want you to ever think that I take you for granted.” And so, those are the little things that I do throughout the year, to let them know how much I appreciate them. Now for my personal self, I love horses. I just went to a polo match a couple of weeks ago for a fundraiser. So I love horses. Yes, I just-

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Nice.

Rosalind Jones:

That power of them running and listening to their feet and stepping on the poop out in the field, is just relaxing.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

I didn’t see that coming. Stepping on the poop in the field? Well-

Rosalind Jones:

I’m sorry.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

No, that’s right. No horses are beautiful. They’re beautiful majestic animal. And I agree, that’s a great way to celebrate, it’s to be around beautiful horses they’re [crosstalk 00:11:35].

Rosalind Jones:

Yeah. Yeah, so horses, yes. Yeah, they give me, I don’t know, it’s just something about that energy that they have when they’re running up and down the field, it is just always [crosstalk 00:11:48] phenomenal. And then to stand next to them, it’s just majestic. So I like things like that, I love the travel, I love to get a pedicure when I can. Some of the things that us girls like to do, I definitely do it for myself, and getting to spend time with my family of course, is something else, like anybody else. It’s been hard during the pandemic because my parents are in Louisiana, and we have not been able to see them for over a year now, the last time we saw them was last year. And then right after Mardi Gras, we haven’t been able to see them. So it’s been hard, it’s been hard. So we hope that maybe after the first of the year, we’ll be able to get over there, but just like everybody else, COVID has hit me personally, as well as my clients.

Valerie VanBooven RN BSN:

Oh yeah. Yeah, I think it’s becoming slimmer and slimmer that you don’t know somebody who’s been affected by it, in your family or personally, and or staff or whatever. So, yeah, it is definitely been rough. Rough seven or eight months now, and we’ll all be glad when we can act like regular human beings again. So, all right. Well, I want to thank you for doing the show. You are a delight, and I want to thank you for sharing your wisdom with us. This has been great. So thank you.